andrewclifton:

the differences between how the world views OUR sexuality has never been more blatantly apparent to me than this. I randomly googled both and came up with these results. not there is a THING wrong with porn but when an entire world views black sex as ONLY porn then we have a real fucking problem.

-Andrew Thomas Clifton

(via deviantfemme)

bootyxqueen:

Stretch marks should be kissed not dissed

(via queerandpresentdanger)

youngblackandvegan:

racism-sexist-ableism-ohmy:

goingdownthebayou:

ishyagrrrl:

My brother sent me a picture of a few young girls protesting outside of Party City in Harlem, today. They want Princess Tiana back.

Amazing! “Kids don’t see racial differences.” “Tiana is available online only” You go girls!!!

"Representation doesn’t matter."
"Kids don’t see race."
These girls just proved you all wrong.

precious angels!

youngblackandvegan:

racism-sexist-ableism-ohmy:

goingdownthebayou:

ishyagrrrl:

My brother sent me a picture of a few young girls protesting outside of Party City in Harlem, today. They want Princess Tiana back.

Amazing! “Kids don’t see racial differences.” “Tiana is available online only” You go girls!!!

"Representation doesn’t matter."

"Kids don’t see race."

These girls just proved you all wrong.

precious angels!

(via queerandpresentdanger)

micdotcom:

The Miss Indian World pageant is the answer to Miss America we’ve been looking for

When Kira Kazantsev was crowned the new Miss America on Sunday night, a feeling of déjá vu set in.

Not only was she white — like all but nine of the 94 winners before her — she also fit snugly into a narrowly defined standard of Western female attractiveness: early 20s, long flowing hair and a thin, painstakingly tanned physique that would not seem out of place in a Victoria’s Secret catalog.

In many ways, the Miss Indian World pageant’s definition of what American beauty truly entails is the ideological antithesis to Miss America. Indeed, since 1984, this five-day competition based in Albuquerque, N.M., has honored Native American woman for their contributions to their communities, not their bikini bodies. The top award is given to the contestant who “best represents her culture,” according to Al Jazeera.

Why this pageant is world’s better 

(via deviantfemme)

ultravioletrai:

I love my skin!

Do you all understand how important this is? Do you? So many dark skinned girls will look at this—or have seen this and will feel, even if by a little, better about themselves. Sometimes all a kid needs is validation from someone who is just a little bit like them in some way or form (you know that word “representation”?) so they can easily believe and SEE they, too, can get to that level of whatever in their life. In this case a girl can say, “hey she’s dark like me and loves her skin. I can too!” It’s one thing for someone in their everyday life to shower them with love and assurance that they’re fine in the skin they’re in, but it’s another thing to actually bare witness to it in the media you consume. It’s not just your mom being nice to you. The world thinks you’re fine the way you are too. This is so important. They need to see women like this everywhere. They need to see themselves saying they love what society says they should hate. They NEED, TO,
SEE, THIS. It’s revolutionary to say you love what you got and didn’t ask for despite the world telling you otherwise. So bless Sesame Street, man. The Whip My Hair bit from Willow and now the loving your skin color bit with Lupita makes them a SUPER important children’s program.

(via hucketry)

feral-fae:

Can we please just stop saying “special needs” when we mean “accommodations that level the playing field so disabled peeps can get their shit done”? I don’t have special needs. I have reasonable needs. I don’t need you to make school and work easy for me. I don’t need easier tasks. I need to be provided with the tools to make tasks doable. That’s not “special.”

(via hucketry)

noworld42mro:

emily-adomestic:

I made these to put up around my school for my school’s GSA. They are quotes from some little known bisexuals about their bisexuality.

Lets stop bisexual erasure and remember, bisexuality is real!

Bisexual erasure is a huge thing, even in the LG community. Let’s raise the awareness!

(via queerfatbutch)